Medieval Pottery Research Group

Medieval Ceramics 20, 1996
Contents and Abstracts

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Medieval Ceramics 20, 1996

A4, 106 pages, including 3 full-page colour plates


Contents

Editorial
K Barclay and M Hughes
1
The Late Medieval Pottery Industry on the North Suffolk Border
S Anderson, AM Breen, J Caruth and D Gill
3
Lead glazing technique from a medieval kiln site at Hanley Swan, Warwickshire
D Hurst and IC Freestone
13
Glazed eleventh-century wall tiles from London
IM Betts
19
Results of neutron activation analysis on Tating ware and the Mayen industry
H Stilke, A Hein and H Mommsen
25
Middle Meuse valley ceramics of Huy-type: a preliminary analysis
W Giertz
33
 

Compendiario:

A complete anthropomorphic/zoomorphic jug from Aberdeen
A Cameron
65
The Dean's Dump? or the Merchant of Stafford?
DA Ford and A Gutiérrez
67
Interim statement on the excavation of a medieval kiln site at Eden Street, Kingston Upon Thames
R Stephenson and P Miller
71
The Age of Transition: the archaeology of English culture 1400–160074
MPRG 1997 Annual Conference at Worcester75
Obituaries: Group Captain Frank Britton, Lady Teresa Briscoe and Professor Martin Jope76
 

Reviews

D Hook and D Gaimster Trade and Discovery: the scientific study of artefacts from post-medieval Europe and beyond (C Orton)79
M Mellor Oxfordshire Pottery: a synthesis of middle and late Saxon, medieval and early post-medieval pottery in the Oxford Region (A Slowikowski)79
M Redknap and JG Perry, 'Medieval and later pottery', in The Excavations at Broadgate East, Coventry 1974–5 (DA Ford)80
JC Austin British Delft at Williamsburg (R Stephenson)81
P Kleij, 'Oosterhuits Aardewerk', Assembled Articles 2 (S Ostkamp)82
P Bitter Geworteld in de bodem. Archeologisch en historisch onderzoek van een pottenbakkerij bij de Wortelsteeg in Alkmaar (EMChF Klijn)82
G Sveinbjarnardóttir Leiker á Íslandi. Pottery found in excavations in Iceland (D Gaimster)83

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Abstracts

The Late Medieval Pottery Industry on the North Suffolk Border

Sue Anderson, AM Breen, Joanna Caruth and David Gill

Recent excavations at West Street, Rickinghall Inferior, revealed a late medieval pottery kiln and associated products. This discovery has enabled limited comparative work to be carried out on the previously discovered kilns of similar date in the neighbouring parishes of Hopton, Wattisfield and Hinderclay. Descriptions of fabric types from other Waveney Valley kiln groups are presented, and the form types are discussed in relation to the Late Medieval and Transitional (LMT) pottery tradition in East Anglia.


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Lead glazing technique from a medieval kiln site at Hanley Swan, Warwickshire

Derek Hurst and Ian Freestone

Fieldwork has recently located the site of a kiln at Hanley Swan in Worcestershire. This was partially excavated, and among the finds there were sherds of pottery with a white coating. Analysis by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction confirms that the coatings are unmatured pottery glaze. Lead oxide had been applied, without admixed material, and the glaze formed by reaction with the body.


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Glazed eleventh-century wall tiles from London

IM Betts

Recent excavation and research has brought to light a small group of early medieval glazed wall tiles which appear to be unique to important religious sites in London. The form and provenance of these tiles is discussed and suggestions are made about their possible origin and their relationship with late Anglo-Saxon and early medieval tiles found in London.


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Results of neutron activation analysis on Tating Ware and the Mayen industry

H Stilke, A Hein and H Mommsen

Early medieval Tating Ware has been considered from different aspects for more than 80 years. This paper will give a short survey of the discussion but it will focus on the least resolved question about the ware, namely the question of provenience. Recent research has drawn attention to Mayen as the production centre of Tating Ware. Neutron Activation Analyses carried out on samples from Mayen and Tating Ware from different locations showed that most of the Tating Ware belonged to a main group which was not produced in Mayen. Only one sample, a variant of the classic ware, was produced in Mayen.


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Middle Meuse valley ceramics of Huy-type: a preliminary analysis

W Giertz

This paper focuses on a sequence of domestic pottery excavated at the Place St Severin site in Huy, Belgium. Macroscopic examination of selected context groups spanning the 8th to 11th centuries assisted in the identification of a predominant group of wares, which share diagnostic features with pottery found in production contexts in Huy. This cluster of presumed local wares is named Huy-type wares and classified with regard to the main fabric types represented. The wide repertoire of Carolingian Huy-type wares is indicated, while their gradual development from the Middle Meuse valley and perhaps in Stamford, Lincolnshire, are briefly discussed with special reference to late-Carolingian red-painted and early glazed ware.


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