Medieval Pottery Research Group

Medieval Ceramics 21, 1997
Contents and Abstracts

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Medieval Ceramics 21, 1997

A4, 149 pages, including 3 full-page colour plates


Contents

Editorial
K Barclay and M Hughes
1
Islamic Pottery in Christian Europe from the 10th to the 15th century: The Twelfth Gerald Dunning Lecture
David Whitehouse
3
The Excavation of two Late Medieval Kilns with Associated Buildings at Glapthorn, near Oundle, Northamptonshire
Gillian Johnston
13
Evidence for the Early 16th-century Surrey-Hampshire Border Ware Industry from the City of London
Jacqueline Pearce
43
Misplaced Faith? Medieval Pottery and Fieldwalking
Christopher Gerrard
61
Cheapish and Spanish. Meaning and Design on Imported SpanishPottery
Alejandra Gutierrez
73
Pots from Houses
Duncan H Brown
83
Ceramics and the History of Consumption: Pitfalls and Prospects
Paul Courtney
95
Medieval Vessels of Other Materials - A Non Ceramic View
Geoff Egan
109
 

Compendiario

Handling Pottery at the Guildford Museum, Judy Stevenson115
Medieval Europe 1997: International Conference of Medieval and Later Archaeology: lst-4th October, 1997, Bruges116
Archaeology of the British 1600-1800: Views from two Worlds, London, November 1997
118
Ceramic Technology and Production, London, November 1997118
Obituary: Rupert Bruce-Mitford119
 

Reviews

I Freestone and D Gaimster (eds) Pottery in the Making (C Orton)123
John W Hayes Handbook of Mediterranean Roman Pottery (M Redknap)123
D Gaimster German Stoneware (IG Hurst)124
M Mellor Pots and People that have shaped the Heritage of Medieval and Later England (D Hinton)125

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Abstracts

Islamic Pottery in Christian Europe from the 10th to the 15th century: The Twelfth Gerald Dunning Lecture

David Whitehouse

In the later Middle Ages, wealthy Europeans were familiar with luxury objects made in the Islamic world, and urban communities around the northern shores of the Mediterranean were familiar with Muslim traders and their merchandise. Some of the merchandise - ceramica magrebina, for example - stimulated a demand for new kinds of tableware, and this affected the character of European ceramic production. Tin-glazing, often accompanied by decoration in brown and green, became firmly established in Christian Spain, Italy and southern France in the 13th century; pottery and tiles with lustre decoration were sought after all over Europe in the 15th century; and, perhaps under influence from Muslim Spain, fine ceramics became a vehicle for the display of wealth and status.


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The Excavation of two Late Medieval Kilns with Associated Buildings at Glapthorn, near Oundle, Northamptonshire

Gillian Johnston

Two late medieval potting and tiling establishments with kilns and associated buildings discovered in Glapthorn, Northamptonshire, have provided the first evidence of dual function kilns used to burn lime between pottery firings.


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Evidence for the Early 16th-century Surrey-Hampshire Border Ware Industry from the City of London

Jaqueline Pearce

An early 16th-century phase of redware production in the pottery industry of the Surrey-Hampshire borders is proposed on the basis of the unique find of a considerable quantity of fine, glazed redware cups from a single site at Cripplegate in the City of London. Following petrological examination and comparison with the products of various contemporaneous ceramic industries supplying London, the term Early Red Border ware is proposed for this previously unrecognised fabric, a typology is presented and reasons are suggested for the deposition of a single type of pottery in such large numbers in one area of the City alone. An early 16th-century phase of fine whiteware production in the Border industry is also proposed as intermediate between the manufacture of 'Tudor Green' ware and the introduction of Border ware proper in the mid 16th century.


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Misplaced Faith? Medieval Pottery and Fieldwalking

Christopher Gerrard

The Shapwick project, Somerset, began in 1989 as a ten-year, multi-disciplinary landscape investigation focused particularly upon the evolution of early and late medieval settlement patterns. One of the aims of the project is to examine appropriate methodologies for the investigation of rural historic landscapes. This paper considers the efficacy of fieldwalking as a means of identifying archaeological monuments and land-use for the medieval period.


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Cheapish and Spanish. Meaning and Design on Imported Spanish Pottery

Alejandra Gutierrez

This paper considers the contention that the meaning of pottery is culturally specific and often transmutable. Taking the differing forms and decorative styles of imports of Spanish medieval pottery as an example, it is argued that the pots often had special meanings attached to them in the minds of the Mediterranean potters who originally produced them. This meaning was carried mainly in their specific colour and motifs of decoration and can only be explained by understanding the social setting of pottery production. Once imported into southern England these nuances were then lost on consumers of a different nationality and religion and the pots attained new significance, often said to relate to the reinforcement of social standing.


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Pots from Houses

Duncan H Brown

Assemblages from three different medieval houses are compared. One is a rural farmstead on the Marlborough Downs, one is a town house in Winchester, one is a substantial merchant's house in the port of Southampton. The composition of each assemblage is compared in terms of the range of ware types, and thus production areas, represented, and the variety of vessel forms present. The purpose is to examine the differing requirements of the occupants of each house and the character of the markets at which they acquired their pottery. The concluding section introduces evidence from a fourth site, a rural manorial complex, as the contrasts and similarities between rural and urban assemblages are discussed.


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Ceramics and the History of Consumption: Pitfalls and Prospects

Paul Courtney

This article attempts to outline some of the main theoretical issues and practical achievements in the history of consumption. It does not attempt to offer a history of ceramic consumption but instead aims to raise a number of methodological and theoretical issues relevant to ceramic interpretation of the medieval and post-medieval periods.


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Medieval Vessels of Other Materials - A Non Ceramic View

Geoff Egan

Large, closely dated assemblages of medieval finds from London, which include well-preserved fragments of wood, glass and metal vessels, have provided an opportunity to gauge for the first time from excavated evidence how the availability and use of these different materials, and of others less common, may have related to each other in the capital over a period of some 300 years. A summary table of these datable finds, given below., can be set beside figures from suitable assemblages elsewhere to try to define similarities or differences in trends suggested. It may eventually be possible to pinpoint regional or national regularities in the late medieval consumption of vessels made of the various materials.


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