Medieval Pottery Research Group

Medieval Ceramics 25, 2001
Contents and Abstracts

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Medieval Ceramics 25

A4, 144 pages, colour and monochrome plates


Contents

Editorial
Jacqueline Pearce and Lucy Whittingham
1
Medieval pottery from Forehill, Ely, Cambridgeshire
David Hall
2
Some late 12th or early 13th century great brick at Farnham Castle, Surrey
Nicholas Riall
22
A medieval pottery kiln-clamp, possible workshop and settlement at Eshott, Northumberland
Piers Dixon and Amanda Crowdy
27
An evaluation of geochemical fingerprinting for the provenancing of Scottish redware pottery
Simon Chenery, Emrys Phillips and George Haggerty
45
Historically visible but archaeologically invisible? The Huguenots of Spitalfields
Nigel Jeffries
54
From maiolica to delftware: tin-glazed earthenware in London and the Low Countries, 1570-1630
John Black
65
Prologues and epilogues in Islamic ceramics: clays, repairs and secondary use
Marcus Milwright
72
Post-Roman pottery unearthed: medieval ceramics and pottery research in Greece
Athanasios K Vionis
84
PotWeb: museum documentation - a world vision
Jeremy Haslam, Maureen Mellor and Jonathan Moffett
99
MPRG Annual Bibliography 2001
collated by L Pieksma, P Davey and P Tomlinson
108
 

Reviews

Katherine Barclay Scientific Analysis of Archaeological Ceramics: A Handbook of Resources (Helen Hatcher)125
Ian M Betts Medieval 'Westminster' Floor Tiles (Paul Drury)126
John Black British Tin-Glazed Earthenware and Anthony Ray English Delftware (Clive Orton)126
Mark Brisbane and David Gaimster Novgorod: the Archaeology of a Russian Medieval City and its Hinterland (Alan Vince)127
Duncan H Brown Pottery in Medieval Southampton c1066-1510 (Lorraine Mepham)128
Ivor Noël Hume If These Pots Could Talk: Collecting 2,000 Years of British Household Pottery (Merry Outlaw) 130
Jean Rosen La Faïence en France du XIVe au XIX siècle. Histoire et Technique (Lyn Blackmore) 131
 

Corrigenda

Medieval Tiles of Wales
John Lewis
134
 

News

Obituaries: John Evans136
Obituaries: Peter Farmer137
Obituaries: John Hurst138

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Abstracts

Medieval pottery from Forehill, Ely, Cambridgeshire

David Hall

Excavations at Forehill, Ely, in 1996, by Mary Alexander for the Cambridge Archaeological Unit, produced a range of pottery used in the city during the 12th to 15th centuries. This is the first time that a reference pottery collection from the city has been available. The main group consisted of gritty fabrics identified as products of the medieval Ely pottery industry. The Ely forms have been classified and are illustrated along with other material. The distribution of Ely pottery has not yet been fully established, but the fabric has been recognized by the author in recently excavated material from King's Lynn and at sites in Cambridge and nearby, and by Hilary Healey in South Lincolnshire and Andrew Rogerson in West Norfolk.


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Some late 12th or early 13th century great brick at Farnham Castle, Surrey

Nicholas Riall

The discovery of great bricks in the fabric of Farnham Castle, and dateable to before 1208, represents its first known use as building material outside East Anglia in a context other than a tile kiln.


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A medieval pottery kiln-clamp, possible workshop and settlement at Eshott, Northumberland

Piers Dixon and Amanda Crowdy

Emergency excavation and fieldwork in advance of the North Sea Gas Pipeline through Northumberland revealed a mid- to late 12th-century pottery kiln, a possible workshop and settlement. Rural medieval pottery kilns in north-east England are rare. The kiln is a clamp-kiln and its products include both glazed and unglazed vessels. The distribution of the products is local, but they are paralleled by types found elsewhere in north-east England.


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An evaluation of geochemical fingerprinting for the provenancing of Scottish redware pottery

Simon Chenery, Emrys Phillips and George Haggerty

A geochemical study was undertaken to evaluate whether it was possible to accurately fingerprint Scottish, post-medieval and later red ware pottery sherds. The primary objective was to establish a set of criteria to distinguish between the pottery sherds on both a site and regional basis as an aid to provenancing. These preliminary investigations also utilised the British Geological Survey's national geochemical database of stream sediment analyses as an aid to predicting the potential clay source regions. The results of this study clearly demonstrate the potential power of this combined geochemical and statistical approach, and its application to archaeological site investigations.


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Historically visible but archaeologically invisible? The Huguenots of Spitalfields

Nigel Jeffries

Throughout all periods, the historical, archaeological and anthropological study of the material culture of distinctive ethnic groups has always been a topic of much research and debate. The emigration of Europeans (through colonialism) and Africans (by slavery) during the post-medieval period, notably to America and the Caribbean, has been widely studied. As a result, little comment has been made on those immigrant communities settling into Britain and their impact on the archaeological record. However, the recent excavations, on part of the post-medieval suburb of Spitalfields in East London, have given the opportunity partly to redress the balance by allowing the study of the pottery from an area settled by the Huguenots (Protestant refugees from France and the Low Countries).


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From maiolica to delftware: tin-glazed earthenware in London and the Low Countries, 1570-1630

John Black

English tin-glazed earthenware was introduced into this country by immigrant potters from the Netherlands who settled in Norwich in 1567 and moved to London three years later. Netherlands personnel, technology and decorative styles dominated English production till the second quarter of the 17th century. Facing competition from imports of oriental porcelain, tin-glaze potters in the Netherlands introduced a number of technological changes in an attempt to imitate porcelain, bringing about a transition from the traditional maiolica to the new delftware. These changes form the basis for an understanding of developments in England, and are discussed in this article.


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Prologues and epilogues in Islamic ceramics: clays, repairs and secondary use

Marcus Milwright

This article presents evidence concerning the attitudes towards clays, the repair of broken vessels, and the secondary use of pottery in the Islamic world. The collection and analysis of primary written sources and archaeological information aims to illustrate the diversity of responses to ceramic in its various states from raw material to broken sherd. It is argued that, in order to come to a deeper understanding of the social roles performed by ceramics in a given context, it is necessary to attempt to integrate the information from archaeological investigations and primary textual sources.


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Post-Roman pottery unearthed: medieval ceramics and pottery research in Greece

Athanasios K Vionis

In north-western Europe it has long been realised that potsherds should not be used exclusively as a dating tool but also as a means for examining aspects of socio-economic organisation, trade and exchange, dining and drinking habits. In contrast to methodological advances in Europe, medieval and post-medieval archaeology in Greece is still in its dawn. Remains of the post-Roman periods have just begun to be decently excavated and scientifically recorded. On the basis of older and recently published excavations in urban centres (Athens, Corinth and Thessaloniki) and surface surveys in the Greek countryside and other areas in the eastern Mediterranean, this paper offers an overall review of pottery forms and styles found in Greece. Case studies are also used from the late medieval and post-medieval Aegean islands of the Cyclades, examining some first results of the CYREP (Cyclades Research Project) survey research. Medieval pottery research in Greece is discussed in an attempt to examine socio-economic and cultural aspects of post-Roman ceramics in Greece in terms of trade and contacts between East and West, economic and social formation, cultural and/or symbolic meanings and domestic life.


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PotWeb: museum documentation - a world vision

Jeremy Haslam, Maureen Mellor and Jonathan Moffett

This paper demonstrates how an English museum is seeking to make its most abundant heritage resource - pottery - accessible world-wide, 24 hours a day. The project, code named PotWeb is designed to benefit a wide range of enquirers and to encourage them to visit the collections in person.


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