Conference in Honour of Sarah Jennings

The Medieval Pottery Research Group and the Association for the History of Glass are organising a one day conference in honour of the late Sarah Jennings. The day will consist of papers on the theme of Recent Research and New Discoveries in Glass and Ceramics and will end with a wine reception. The conference representing some of Sarah’s many ceramic and glass interests will be introduced by Duncan Brown, President of the MPRG; Justine Bayley, President of the AHG will bring proceedings to a close with an appreciation of Sarah’s role in the societies to whom she gave so much time. The morning and afternoon sessions will be chaired by Duncan Brown and Tony Wilmott respectively.

The Wallace Collection, London have kindly made available their lecture theatre for the event which will be on Friday 16th November 2012.

Jennifer Price of the AHG has volunteered to handle bookings and her contact details are on the attached notice and booking form, which is available here.

MPRG Conference: List of Papers

The MPRG Conference takes place from 21st-25th June on the Isle of Man (papers Thurs eve, Fri and Sat, with fieldtrips Sun and Mon). The list of papers is presented below. To ensure you receive lunch with your registration fee, make sure you register by 14th June! http://www.liv.ac.uk/media/livacuk/manxstudies/mprg2012/Registration%20Form.pdf

Papers include:
The Isle of Man: an introduction to its archaeology and history from medieval to modern times (Andrew Johnson)

Saxo-Norman material from the National Museum excavations in Dublin
(Clare McCutcheon)

Pottery production and consumption in Ireland in the twelfth/fifteenth centuries (Niamh Curtin)

Coarsewares and colonialism: manifestations of continuity and change in Ireland and western Britain (Alison Kyle)

‘Here be monstrous fabrics…’ – devising a strategy for the organic tempered wares of the Scottish West Coast, Highlands and Islands. (Derek Hall)

Iain Crawford’s Udal: the key to ceramic traditions of the western seaboard? (Beverley Ballin Smith)

Pottery in the North Atlantic: A survey of medieval pottery from the Faroe Islands, Iceland and Greenland (Elizabeth Pierce)

Understanding marginality in Glamorgan, South Wales: A ceramic study (Alice Forward)

Scanian Black Earthenware – A Study of Baltic Ware from Lund (Vibeke Vandrup Martens)

Scandinavian redwares (Lyn Blackmore)

Lödöse – A trading town on the edge of Europe (Sonia Jeffrey)

Ceramics produced during the Spanish-Dutch war in the 16th century (Maxime Poulain)

The pottery of a Dutch merchant in Elsinore (Jette Linaa)

On the Western Edge of the Byzantine Empire: Early Medieval pottery finds from recent excavations at Butrint, Albania. (Joanita Vroom)

At the edge of Empire: medieval pottery from the Noviodunum archaeological project (Romania) (Ben Jervis)

Ceramics on the edge: pottery from the medieval site of Jam, Afghanistan (Alison Gascoigne)
The Buckley potteries: imposition, innovation and cultural exchange (Christine Longworth)

The impact of industrial ceramic production on the highlands and islands (George Haggarty)

Cups and Confinement: Ceramics in a First World War Internment Camp (Claire Corkill)

Insights Through Innovation Conference (In Honour of Prof. David Peacock)

The Southampton Ceramics Research Group is proud to announce that the conference ‘Insights from innovation: new light on archaeological ceramics’ will be held at the University of Southampton on 19-20 October 2012. The event is held in recognition of the pioneering contributions to the field by Professor David Peacock. The conference is supported by the Prehistoric Ceramics Research Group, the Study Group for Roman Pottery, and the Medieval Pottery Research Group.

We are seeking papers and posters from specialists who represent a diverse range of recent approaches to archaeological ceramics to join our confirmed keynote speakers Prof. Simon Keay, Dr David Williams, Dr Roberta Tomber and Prof. Michael Fulford. Themes which we hope to address include (but are not limited to):

·         Advancements in scientific techniques into the dating, production, exchange and use of pottery.

·         Innovative theoretical perspectives.

·         Innovative methodologies.

·         New computing applications, including the use of GIS and 3D modelling.

Abstracts for papers should be no longer than 250 words and submitted to Dr Ben Jervis (bpjervis@googlemail.com) and be submitted by 10th July 2012. Abstracts for posters should be longer than 100 words and submitted by the same deadline.

If you would like to discuss a contribution prior to submitting an abstract please contact Dr Ben Jervis (bpjervis@googlemail.com).

Find out more at http://innovationconference.wordpress.com/

We look forward to hearing from you and seeing you in Southampton in October!

The SCRG Conference Organising Committee.

MPRG Conference: Programme and List of Speakers

CERAMICS ON THE EDGE
The Medieval Pottery Research Group 2012 Annual Conference
21-23 June 2012
Manx Museum,
Douglas, Isle of Man

THURSDAY 21 JUNE
19.30
Conference Registration opens

19.30 Wine Reception

20.15 Welcome and Introduction

20.30 Gerald Dunning Memorial Lecture: ‘The Isle of Man: central or marginal in the
ceramic history of these islands – a case study’. Peter Davey, Centre for Manx
Studies, University of Liverpool.

FRIDAY 22 JUNE

09.15 Conference Registration for delegates continues

09.40 – 10.30 Session 1

11.40 – 1.00 Session 2

13.00 – 14.00 Buffet Lunch

14.00 – 15.15 Session 3

MPRG Annual General Meeting followed by: Viewing ceramics from the Isle of Man and brought by delegates 1.

15.45 – 16.45 Session 4

Viewing ceramics from the Isle of Man and brought by delegates 2.

SATURDAY 23 JUNE

09.40 – 10.30 Session 1

11.50 – 1.00 Session 2

13.15 – 14.00 Buffet Lunch

14.00 – 15.15 Session 3

16.10 – 17.15 Session 4

17.15 Formal conference ends

20.00 Conference Dinner at the Aroma Buffet Restaurant

24-25 JUNE

Optional field visits to medieval sites around the island
[The precise routes and mode of transport will depend on numbers]

SUNDAY 24 JUNE
Island Tour 1: Castles and Abbeys.

MONDAY 25 JUNE
Island Tour 2: Chapels, ring-forts, shielings etc.

List of Contributors

Power dressers: ceramics, furniture and distributed agency of people and things in 19th-century cottages of western Britain and Ireland Harold Mytum, Centre for Manx Studies, University of
Liverpool, UK.

At the edge of Empire: medieval pottery from the Noviodunum archaeological project
(Romania). Ben Jervis.

Coarsewares and colonialism: manifestations of continuity and change in Ireland and western
Britain. Alison Kyle, University of Glasgow.

‘Here be monstrous fabrics…’ – devising a strategy for the organic tempered wares of the Scottish West Coast, Highlands and Islands’. Derek Hall.

Scanian Black Earthenware – A Study of Baltic Ware from Lund. Vibeke Vandrup
Martens, Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research (NIKU).

Ceramics produced during the Spanish-Dutch war in the 16th century. Maxime
Poulain.

The impact of industrial ceramic production on the highlands and islands. George
Haggarty.

Understanding marginality in Glamorgan, South Wales: A ceramic study. Alice Forward,
Cardiff University.

The Buckley potteries: imposition, innovation and cultural exchange.Christine Longworth.

Saxo-Norman material from the National Museum excavations in Dublin. Clare McCutcheon.

The pottery of a Dutch merchant in Elsinore. Jette Linaa, Senior Researcher,
Antiquarian Department, Moesgård Museum.

Pottery production and consumption in Ireland in the twelfth/sixteenth centuries. Niamh Doyle.

Ceramics on the edge: Pottery from the medieval site of Jam, Afghanistan. Alison Gascoigne, University of Southampton.

The Isle of Man: an introduction to its archaeology and history from medieval to modern times. Andrew Johnson, Manx National Hertitage

Assorted pottery from Lödöse – a medieval port in Sweden: more questions than answers. Sonia Jeffery, Lödöse Museum/Västarvet.

Pottery in the North Atlantic: A survey of medieval pottery from the Faroe Islands, Iceland and
Greenland. Elizabeth Pierce, University of Glasgow.

Scandinavian Redwares. Lyn Blackmore, Museum of London Archaeology.

Cups and Confinement: Ceramics in a First World War Internment Camp. Claire Corkill,
University of York.

Early medieval (6th to 8th century) pottery production and consumption on the fringe of Frankish, Frisian and Saxon territories in the Netherlands. Arno Verhoeven.

‘On the Western Edge of the Byzantine Empire: Early Medieval pottery finds from recent excavations at Butrint, Albania’. Joanita Vroom, Leiden University.

Booking details can be found at http://www.liv.ac.uk/media/livacuk/manxstudies/mprg2012/MPRG_2012_Registration_Form.pdf

North West Regional Group Meeting

A meeting of the North West Region Medieval Pottery Research Group will be held on Saturday 24th March in Liverpool.
Apologies for the short notice but Rob Philpott, Sam Rowe and I thought you would like the opportunity to see the recently discovered assemblage of pottery from Rainford, St Helens reported on by Sam Rowe in the last MPRG newsletter: https://www.medievalpottery.org.uk/nlcurr.pdf

This important material suggests a source for some of the Cistercian-type wares found in the North West and provides evidence for an early post-medieval production centre in the region. Sam has been working hard to get the assemblage washed, sorted and catalogued before her placement at Liverpool Museum ends in a few weeks.

The day will start at 10.30 and will be an informal occasion with the morning spent looking at the evidence for 16th and 17th century pottery production in Rainford, St Helens. In the afternoon we will discuss the significance of the recent discoveries at Rainford for pottery use and distribution in the area, in particular Cistercian-type wares. Participants are welcome to bring along groups of Cistercian-type wares and early blackwares and yellow wares from excavations in their area. There will be an opportunity at the end of the afternoon to visit the new Liverpool Museum and see the pottery in their displays.
We will finish by 16.00.

Rob has kindly organised a room for us in the Maritime Museum basement, Albert Dock; for directions and details of public transport please see the Liverpool Museums website:
http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/maritime/visit/directions.aspx
Parking is not easy – dropping off pottery can be done at the Maritime Museum from 10.00, parking might be possible outside the Dock Traffic Office but there are only about 4 spaces and it will be first come first served. Failing that, there is parking at Kings Dock – 10 minute walk but £5 for 5 hours. There is also a small carpark outside the Dock Traffic office – this is just being renovated so the charges are not visible at present.

If you would like to attend please email Julie Edwards vicepres@medievalpottery.org.uk

Session at EAA Conference, Helsinki (August 2012)

Life in the City: Environmental and Artefactual Approaches to Urban Europe in the Middle Ages

Organisers: Ben Jervis (English Heritage; UK), Lee Broderick (University of York; UK) and Idoia Grau-Sologestoa (University of the Basque Country; Spain)

Traditional approaches to the study of Medieval urbanism have focused upon the reconstruction of town plans and the study of trade and craft activity. The wider potential of environmental and artefactual remains has not been fully realised. The aim of this session is to explore the range of insights that detailed study of these remains can provide in exploring, for example:
– The levels of similarity and difference between urban and rural living. Did a continuum or a dichotomy emerge through everyday life in these different environments? How did engagements with objects and the environment contribute to a uniquely urban existence?
– Did urbanism foster a worldview in which similar material and environmental objects generated different symbolic meanings?
– How did experiences of urban life vary between individuals and households, based, for example, on their wealth, ethnicity, gender or profession?
– How did experiences of urban life vary between towns, for example, through the exposure of members of their population to international influences?
– The level of mutual dependence between urban and rural communities. How interdependent were towns and their hinterlands and cities and their regions (including smaller towns)?
– How can artefactual and/or environmental evidence help us understand the social structure of towns and cities?
The range of papers in this session will not only allow us to explore these themes using a variety of evidence, but to consider regional and temporal differences in experiences of urban life across Europe. Papers which combine different strands of evidence, to explore the role of artefactual and/or environmental assemblages in answering these questions are particularly encouraged. By moving beyond the characterisation of urban landscapes, this session will begin to question what it was to be urban in Medieval Europe, whether a single conceptualisation of this phenomenon can be reached, or if instead the study of this material leads to an acknowledgement of heterogeneity.

For more information please email bpjervis@googlemail.com

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